Smartphone road assessment system from RoadBotics goes HD

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RoadBotics has announced it is introducing a much-anticipated HD-PCI (high-definition pavement condition index) to its smartphone app RoadSense and road assessment platform, RoadWay.

RoadBotics has always provided its users high-definition imagery of their road network with conditional, colour-coded 1-5 ratings on an interactive map. Now, for clients who opt for the Individual Distress Identification (IDI) assessment, RoadBotics can also provide the high-definition pavement condition index score (HD-PCI) as well.

With traditional PCI, a numerical index of 0-100 is used to indicate the condition for randomly chosen pavement sections; however, RoadBotics’ propriety HD-PCI produces that same rating with more objective data (derived from machine learning algorithms) and factors in the density and severity of each distress present for every square foot of roadway across an entire road network.

“HD-PCI is a critical step forward in the world of pavement management,” says Todd Saulle, RoadBotics’ product manager. “By leveraging pavement distress data from every ten feet of road, RoadBotics has developed a detailed, objective, and reliable pavement index that helps our users better prioritize maintenance without the hassle of pain-staking field work.”

In addition to HD-PCI, users can now view their data in great detail on the IDI Analysis page, where they can create custom tables sorted by road ratings, distress density, and number of specific distresses. The recent Dynamic Segmentation and Embeddable Maps features also now include IDI data for a more complete picture of their road network’s overall health and viability.

Road assessment CSV files and custom tables are also now fully exportable, making users’ road network data more accessible and able to be analysed off-platform.

The official unveiling will occur during RoadBotics first annual virtual User Conference scheduled for Thursday 12 November 2020.

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Tom has edited Traffic Technology International magazine and the Traffic Technology Today website since May 2014. During his time at the title he has interviewed some of the top transportation chiefs in charge of public agencies around the world as well as chairmen and CEOs of multinational transportation technology corporations. Tom's early career saw him working on some the UK's leading consumer magazine titles. He has a law degree from the London School of Economics (LSE).