USDOT seeks public comment on automated driving systems

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The U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is seeking public comment on the potential development of a framework of principles to govern the safe behaviour of automated driving systems (ADS) in the future.

The Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM) was submitted to the Federal Register on November 19 and is available online here.

While no ADS-equipped vehicle is available for sale to the public today and widescale deployment of ADS-equipped vehicles is likely years away, NHTSA and others have identified elements of a framework necessary for objectively defining and assessing ADS competence.

This ANPRM seeks public comment on these elements and how they could most appropriately form a framework that provides for motor vehicle safety while also providing flexibility to develop more effective safety innovations.

“This rulemaking will help address legitimate public concerns about safety, security and privacy without hampering innovation in the development of automated driving systems,” said US Secretary of Transportation Elaine L. Chao.

“ADS technologies are different from more conventional automotive equipment, and it is necessary and appropriate to consider how ADS standards can and should be articulated,” said NHTSA Deputy Administrator James Owens.  “The framework of principles would objectively define, assess, and manage the safety of ADS, while ensuring the flexibility to enable further innovation.  NHTSA seeks feedback on the approaches described in the ANPRM.”

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Tom has edited Traffic Technology International magazine and the Traffic Technology Today website since May 2014. During his time at the title he has interviewed some of the top transportation chiefs in charge of public agencies around the world as well as chairmen and CEOs of multinational transportation technology corporations. Tom's early career saw him working on some the UK's leading consumer magazine titles. He has a law degree from the London School of Economics (LSE).