Kapsch to deploy transportation management platform for Port Authority of New York and New Jersey

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The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey (PANYNJ) has awarded Kapsch TrafficCom North America a four-year, US$8.8m contract to install an agency-wide transportation management software (ATMS) system across all the agency’s assets.

The contract, won by the Austrian company’s US subsidiary, consists of a four-year base term followed by two additional one-year optional support periods. Powered by Kapsch’s DYNAC software platform, the new system will enable the Authority to manage intelligent transportation system (ITS) assets at its bridges, tunnels, aviation and port facilities, and the PATH rail transit system, from any of its individual facility Operations Control Centers (OCCs) and the Port Authority Agency Operation Center (PA-AOC). The new ATMS will help the Authority improve operational efficiency, agency-wide visibility of travel conditions, and enhance regional transportation coordination.

Kapsch already has a strong local presence in New York and New Jersey. In July 2016, the company was awarded a contract to replace the toll collection system and perform ongoing system maintenance upon completion of the new toll system installation for a six-year period at all bridges and tunnels managed by the PANYNJ.

The new ATMS will enable PANYNJ to better manage its critical transportation-related assets and infrastructure. Kapsch will merge 21 independent traffic and facility management data systems into a single enterprise DYNAC-based ATMS that will manage the Authority’s vital ‘Gateways to the Nation’ transportation assets, including the George Washington, Bayonne, and Goethals Bridges and Outerbridge Crossing, Lincoln and Holland Tunnels, LaGuardia, JFK International and Newark Liberty International Airports, and the Port Newark-Elizabeth Marine Terminal.

Deployed in redundant data centers to improve reliability, maintainability and security, the new ATMS will replace independent legacy systems with an agency-wide, next-generation architecture. All Authority assets will be able to be managed from any individual facility, as well as the PA-AOC, providing agency-wide situational awareness. The ATMS will enable rapid, consistent and appropriate responses to traffic incidents and tunnel life safety events, by generating and executing real-time response plans to help facility and AOC operators expertly manage time-sensitive, critical situations. New software at the Ferry Transportation Unit, Port Authority Bus Terminal, GWB Bus Station, Teterboro and Stewart International Airports, and PATH, will inform all Authority facilities on the status of the regional transportation network.

DYNAC is a high-performance, integrated software suite deployed at vital transportation facilities around the world. Featuring the latest software technology, the platform’s management applications and highly configurable design allow it to be deployed in a variety of ITS applications, including open freeways, toll roads, tunnels, bridges, managed lanes, and reversible roadways. The ATMS will facilitate enhanced motorist safety and mobility by improving regional travel throughout the PANYNJ’s transportation system infrastructure.

The ATMS will communicate with the ‘511’ telephone information system database, and the traffic and incident data systems used by the Authority to convey real-time traveler information to regional transportation agencies and the traveling public. This streamlined interface will improve agency operational efficiency and information accuracy, facilitate consistent workflows, and enhance environmental monitoring and reporting capabilities.

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Tom has edited Traffic Technology International magazine and the Traffic Technology Today website since he joined the company in May 2014. Prior to this he worked on some of the UK's leading consumer magazine titles including Men's Health and Glamour, beginning his career in journalism in 1997 after graduating with a law degree from the London School of Economics (LSE).

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