Traffic Technology Today.com
Subscribe to Traffic Technology
Subscribe to Traffic Technology
   Sort by: relevance most recent
  

NEWS >>

Roadmap Report grades highway safety laws

Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety (Advocates) has released the ‘2013 Roadmap of State Highway Safety Laws’, its 10th annual report card, which grades all 50 states and DC on their performance on 15 basic traffic safety laws. The new report focuses on the new incentive grant programs created under the ‘Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act’ (MAP-21), to encourage state enactment of teen driver licensing laws, all-offender ignition interlock laws, distracted driving laws and occupant protection programs. Advocates is a coalition of consumer, health, and safety organizations and insurance agents and companies that work together to advance state and federal highway and vehicle safety laws, programs and policies. Among the 15 highway safety laws Advocates evaluated in its 2013 report are seat belt, booster seat and motorcycle helmet measures, in addition to restrictions and requirements for teen drivers, all-driver texting bans and tougher impaired driving laws.

In this year’s report, states were given one of three ratings based on how many of the 15 optimal laws they have: Green (Good); Yellow (Caution - state needs improvement); and Red (Danger - state falls dangerously behind). Placement in one of the three ratings was based solely on whether or not a state had adopted a law as defined in the report, and not on any evaluation of a state’s highway safety education or enforcement programs. The best states are New York, District of Columbia, Illinois, Kansas, New Jersey, North Carolina, Oregon, Delaware, Georgia, Rhode Island and Washington. The states with the worst ratings are South Dakota, Mississippi, Arizona, Montana, Nebraska, Wyoming, Iowa, Florida, Missouri, New Hampshire, North Dakota, South Carolina and Texas.

Preliminary National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) data show the largest jump in traffic fatalities since 1975; a 7.1% increase in crash deaths during the first nine months of 2012, compared to the first nine months of 2011. “The traffic safety progress we’ve made since 2005 is at risk of being undone,” said Jacqueline Gillan, president of Advocates. “Several states have been moving backwards and most states are not moving at all to enact lifesaving laws. Last year only 10 state highway safety laws were enacted, in contrast to 16 laws passed in 2011 and 22 laws passed in 2010. Now is the time for states to act and get the ‘triple bonus’ of preventing deaths, saving taxpayer dollars, and reaping additional federal dollars available from the MAP-21 grant program. Every state legislature is in session this year and there is no excuse for inaction by Governors and elected leaders.”

January 17, 2013

Email


RECEIVE THE
LATEST NEWS


Your email address:



Monthly Poll >>

Will the public ever accept road user charging?

MAGAZINE >>

Read latest issueNEW DIGITAL EDITION:

The Oct/Nov 2017 issue of Traffic Technology International is now online.

Click here to read digital version
Click here to subscribe

Read now >>

VISION ZERO >>

Read latest issueNEW DIGITAL EDITION:

The June 2017 issue of Vision Zero International is now online.

Click here to read digital version
Click here to subscribe

Read now >>

INTERTRAFFIC WORLD >>

Read latest issueNEW DIGITAL EDITION:

Intertraffic World 2018 showcase is now online.


Click here to read digital version
Click here to subscribe

Read now >>


TOLLTRANS >>

Read latest issueNEW DIGITAL EDITION:

Tolltrans 2017 is now online.



Click here to read digital version
Click here to subscribe

Read now >>